At What Cost Is Net Worth Diversification Worth It?

Net Worth DiversificationThe following is a guest post from Chris, a fella I met while stranded in Frankfurt, en route home from my business trip to Switzerland and Mallorca to do more research on the happiest countries in the world. Chris has a dilemma and could use the community’s help! – Sam

It was early evening when the airplane broke so the airline had to put up all of the passengers in a local hotel – to make matters challenging we were unable to get our checked luggage and had to survive on the contents of our carry-on bags. Upon entering the lobby I quickly noted that the hotel check-in line was 17 passengers deep so I decided to “wait” in the hotel bar (which was oddly empty) while my fellow, disgruntled travelers begged for rooms. Another fellow passenger noted the length of the queue and opted for the bar seat right next to me.

My bar partner and I got to drinking, laughing, and chatting about possibly catching a cab into town to procure clean under-garments – I don’t recall how long we sat at the bar, the check-in line was non-existent by the time we got room keys, my decision-making was “gin and tonic clouded” and I was happy that I chose to spend the time making a new friend instead of wasting time in a check-in line. My bar partner was Sam, he told me about his FS journey and I’ve been a regular visitor to the FS site since.

Sweet (Or Sweat) Dreams Of Becoming A Millionaire Again

Daydreaming by Brynja Eldon Flickr CCIn 2013, my income took a big hit. The glow of a six figure severance paid out in 2012 was no more, and I didn’t have a job to pay my bills. All I had was my passive income and a tiny salary I drew from my online media company. I had no desire to pay the employee and employer’s FICA + Medicare tax of 12.4% as an employer employee. Instead, I’d rather take distributions, which are free from such taxes with an S-Corp. Unfortunately, the IRS isn’t stupid and wants to see a balanced income/distribution ratio.

I’ve always thought I was way too lucky to deserve the income I earned during my career in finance. All I did was study hard, get on a 6am bus to a career fair in Washington DC, and interview well enough to land a job that paid well. Nobody from The College of William & Mary, a non-target state school, gets a front office job at Goldman Sachs WHQ. Luck can be the only explanation.

No matter how many times you hear of high income earners going bankrupt, if you are making at least $100,000 a year, it’s relatively easy to become a millionaire. Working in finance almost felt like cheating. You not only gain extensive knowledge to make better financial decisions for yourself, you are also paid handsomely.

When I began looking for other employment opportunities outside of finance, I realized just how good the finance industry pays. It’s very hard to find jobs in tech/internet that pay over $250,000 a year. But in investment banking, practically every 27 year old Associate makes such an amount. Many CEOs in other industries doesn’t even get paid that much.

How To Measure Fiscal Responsibility: Calculate Your FS-FR Score

FS-FR Score For Fiscal Responsibility

FS-FR Score Of 50

We’ve got the Financial Samurai Debt And Investment Ratio (FS-DAIR), which provides a logical framework for deciding how much to invest and how much debt to pay down every time you have some disposable income. The acronym smartly “dares” people to take action with their finances.

I now announce the Financial Samurai Fiscal Responsibility Score (FS-FR) for measuring each individual’s fiscal responsibility level in a fun and easy way. I expect some of you who have a low FS-FR Score will probably not be very happy with the concept and bash the crap out of it. But, that’s part of the fun!

Financial concepts are usually quite dull and hard to comprehend. As a result, they are never followed. But if you come up with something simple like the 1/10th Rule For Car Buying, it might just catch on and save thousands of people from spending more than they should on a depreciating asset.

Before publishing this post, I researched the internet and found nothing similar to the FS-FR Score. Therefore, I’m pleased to report that once again, a new concept is born that may revolutionize our finances! 

The Largest Tax Refund Request Ever! Plus Tax Tips For Small Business Owners

Tax ScamIn what could be the most amazing tax move ever, a Georgia woman filed a $94 MILLION tax refund! You have to make over $1.6 billion dollars in income to pay $94 million taxes with Georgia’s 6% state income tax rate. Sure, it’s possible to make $1.6+ billion dollars, but probably not by this woman.

So how on Earth did she get caught pray tell? Investigators asked the woman to come to the supermarket to pick up her $94 million refund check. That’s when she was arrested.

Supposedly the woman kept calling in to the Georgia tax department asking when her tax refund would be ready. I guess if I was really expecting to get a check that big, I might not be able to help myself either! But a smarter person might have hired an impersonator instead for $500,000 to pick up the check for her and bounce. I mean, what’s paying 0.5% of your tax refund to drastically improve your chances of not getting caught anyway?

Stupidity can’t be the reason why this tax fraud happened. Greed must be the main reason wouldn’t you agree? Have a look at the video clip below.

What’s Your Largest Ongoing Living Expense? Taxes Of Course!

Setting SunThe following is a guest post by FS reader, Jamin Eberhart. He received his MBA, worked in biotech and now consults for biotech companies. He is extremely focused on building his freedom fund, and struggles just like me to find the right balance between living it up and being fiscally responsible. 

The news media is always talking about how the top three costs for households are:

  1. Housing (rent or mortgage)
  2. Car (loan payments and interest)
  3. Education or Child Care (student loans or child schooling)

How To Make Six Figures A Year And Still Not Feel Rich – $200,000 Income Edition

Luxury home on the water

Earning Six Figures Is Not Enough To Buy This Home

One of the great things about America is freedom. Tired of feeling like death living in Chicago or Boston during the winter? Why hello San Diego, Miami, and Honolulu! Not feeling there are enough job opportunities for advancement in Detroit? Then come on down to New York City! Tired of eating healthy food in San Francisco that costs an arm and a leg? No city can beat the wonderful soul food of New Orleans.

Geo-arbitrage is a term where one can earn and save money in one place and move to a cheaper location to maximize their money. I highly recommend it. If you happen to own an internet business, then your ability to geo-arbitrage is greatest. I’ve often thought about just relocating to Thailand for several months at a time given friends say they live extremely well off $2,000 a month for two. Given one of my goals is to take 100 hours of intensive Mandarin lessons, I may very well be writing to you from some lower cost country in the future.

75% of the audience comes to Financial Samurai through a search engine like Google. They have a financial problem they are trying to solve. This is huge because it takes initiative to come to grips with one’s finances. But what I’ve noticed over time is that besides the middle class getting pissed off about the widening wealth gap, upper-income earners are also feeling some angst as well.

Over 50% of singles readers and 74% of household readers make over $100,000 a year based on my Financial Samurai income poll. As a result, I’d like to delve into analyzing how a “typical” $200,000 a year household spends their income. A six figure salary can range from $100,000 to $999,999, so I figure I’d start on the low end for two people. $200,000 is a comfortable household income, but I don’t think it can qualify as rich.

Median Income By Age And Sex In America

median-salary-by-age-and-sexDo Americans have an earnings problem or a savings problem? Unfortunately, I think we’ve got both. Take a look at the median salary by age and sex compiled by Motley Fool from the Census Bureau.

The obvious points are 1) people make more the older they get and 2) men make more than women at every single age group. Making more as you age is nothing insightful. What is insightful is how the difference between men and women’s salaries really start to grow in their 30s. A 25% pay gap is huge!

So what’s going on here? The answer must be biological (life). For example, I have a female friend who was the most gung-ho worker ever. She was an Electrical Engineer in college (one of the hardest majors) and told me that she planned to work “forever” after Harvard Business School. Two years after HBS, she was pregnant, and when I asked her whether she still planned to go back to work she said, “No way! Raising my children is the most important thing in the world to me.”

It’s been five years since she’s been out of the work force. If she decides to return at age 37, it’s logical to assume that she will have to start at a lower pay and title than colleagues who kept working while she was away. Regarding finding a solution to the gender wage gap for equal pay for equal work, the fix I’ve come up with is to have equal paternity leave rights for men and women. With equal paternity leave rights, employers are more blind to discriminate.

What’s interesting is that women have more money in their 401k on average up to the $150,000 income mark, according to a 2014 report by Fidelity Investments with 13 million tracked accounts. Women earning between $20,000 and $40,000, for example, have saved an average of $17,300 in their 401(k) compared to $15,200 for men in the same income range.