Consumers Stand Up For Your Rights: Honda MPG And Recall Issues

Honda MPG Advertised

Misleading Advertisement

One of the main reasons why I bought a 2015 Honda Fit was due to the advertised fuel economy of 32 MPG City, 38 MPG Highway, and 35 MPG overall. My old vehicle was getting 12-16 MPG as a 2000 SUV, and I wanted something more economical to drive around town and to Lake Tahoe.

After going through 8 gallons of a 10.9 gallon tank (fuel light went on), I discovered that Rhino wasn’t getting anything close to the advertised 32 City MPG. Rhino clocked in a paltry 21.6 MPG, or a whopping 32.5% lower than advertised. I’ve since refueled the tank and driven another 200 miles and am now getting closer to 20 MPG in the city. I don’t know about you, but I find this difference egregious.

Here are some examples of getting 32.5% less than you paid for:

* Imagine paying $80 for a 60 minute massage and only getting 40.5 minutes worth.

* Imagine paying $100 for an NBA basketball ticket, and being kicked out 10 minutes into the 3rd quarter.

* Imagine paying $70 for a MLB ticket, and not being able to participate in the 7th inning stretch.

* Imagine paying $170,000 for a private university and only getting to attend for three years.

* Imagine paying $299 for the latest iPhone and only getting 43 GB of storage instead of 64 GB.

* Imagine selling an ounce of cocaine for $1,200 to your neighborhood gangsta who discovers that 1/3rd of the weight is actually powdered sugar. You’d probably get shot.

We buy things based on the advertised features. If the company lies about the feature, then obviously the consumer is being misled and should either get his or her money back, or get a discount based on the shortcomings of the advertised feature. I’m not going to buy the latest Macbook Pro 13″ if it performs like a Macbook from 2007.

Besides the MPG, I also bought the Honda Fit due to its short length of 160″ so I can find more parking spots. The final reason why I bought the Fit was due to Honda’s history of producing reliable cars that are hassle free.

I then got a letter in the mail from Honda.

Better Investing: Figuring Out How Much More To Dollar Cost Average

Confused on when to investDollar cost averaging is the act of consistently investing in a particularly security over a set interval of time. Most like to invest every two weeks or every month since that’s when most get paychecks. For example, let’s say you’ve got $2,000 left a month after you contribute to your 401k and pay your basic living expenses. You invest $1,000 every single month into the S&P 500 ETF, SPY, regardless of whether it’s reaching record highs or going into the crapper. That’s dollar cost averaging.

The great thing about dollar cost averaging is that you don’t have to think too much. All you have to do is not forget to invest, and eventually your financial nut will grow so large you’ll achieve make it rain status. Growing your wealth is all about practicing good financial habits that last over the long run. Sticking with a system of saving and investing will do way more than trying to uncover than unicorn stock for most.

At some point in your life you will either have a financial windfall (year-end bonus, inheritance, gift). There might also be violent corrections in the stock market as you’ll see in a chart below. Given the stock market trajectory over the long-term is up and to the right, you should come up with a framework on how to best take advantage of opportunities in a methodical way.

Here’s how I think about how much to dollar cost average. It’s kind of an oxymoron to “figure out” how much to dollar cost average, but hear me out. Hopefully my framework will help you better deploy your cash. 

The Financial Samurai Podcast Episode 2: Is Paying Down Debt Considered Savings?

Financial Samurai PodcastA reader asked on my post, The Average Savings Rates By Income, whether I consider paying down debt part of my personal savings rate calculation. My immediate thought was yes, but I realized I haven’t been including debt pay down at all when I discuss my after-tax savings rate of 50%+ in various posts on Financial Samurai.

Here is the outline of today’s 17 minute podcast.

Why I Don’t Include Paying Down Debt In My Personal Savings Rate

1) Be conservative. Don’t rely on anybody or any organization to survive. There are a lot of broken promises out there.

2) You don’t reward yourself for doing something bad. Punish yourself instead.

3) Compartmentalize your money. No co-mingling of funds.

By the time you retire, if your property is paid off and you get social security and your 401k then fantastic. If not, then you’re still OK, because you never expected anything from anyone in the first place.

The only time I would consider including paying down debt as part of my personal savings rate is when I pay extra principal down on my primary mortgage. The extra principal pay down could have been used for other wealth-building activities, so including it should be OK. The thing you want to be careful about is being house rich, and cash poor. There’s a balance you’ve got to carefully work out over the years.

Readers, Do you include paying down debt in your personal savings rate? If so, what are the reasons why?

Speaking notes: I appreciate everybody’s feedback from my first podcast entitled, Genesis. About 60% of you seem to want shorter podcasts, so I’ve decided to produce a much shorter 12 minute podcast and see how it goes. In terms of speed, pitch, and tone it doesn’t look like I have a problem based on your comments. But I’ve sped up my speaking speed in this podcast to test. A couple of you mentioned I should be more enthusiastic in delivery and not be afraid of laughing at my jokes. The style I’d like to emulate are the shows from NPR where no matter how crazy the subject, the speaker stays within his zone. I like NPR’s style, so that’s what I plan to go with for now.

To listen to the podcast, click Play to have it play within the post. You can also download the podcast onto your computer or phone by clicking Download. If you don’t see the options in e-mail, click the title of this post to come to my site. 

Related posts:

Use FS-DAIR To Decide On How To Pay Down Debt Or Invest

The Recommended Net Worth Allocation By Age And Work Experience

Life Hack: Use Yelp To Save You Stress, Time, And Money

New Roof Bitumen

New Modified Bitumen Roof

Ever since paying $225 for 15 minutes worth of handyman work, I’ve been trying to figure out what the best way is to improve customer service, get out of hostage negotiation scenarios, and stop getting ripped off.

It doesn’t matter how much money you make or have, getting ripped off is a bad, bad feeling. Not being able to resist a free lunch no matter how much you’re worth is the same idea in reverse. Everybody wants to feel like they are getting a good deal.

After going through some bad deals with my interior painters, electricians, and hardwood floor finishers, I’ve devised a solid system that should help me and many of you in the future.

The internet is the great equalizer that will save us all!

Why Home Remodeling Always Takes Longer And Costs More Than Expected

Amazing, Expensive, KitchenMy general contractor, who is also my tennis teammate, was making fun of me for spending $6,000 for replacing my 40 year old gravity furnace that was lined with asbestos. I needed to replace all my ducts and vacuum seal my house for a day to prevent any asbestos from escaping as part of the replacement and permit process.

“I could have done it for $2,000!” he said as he tried to make me feel bad about my decision.

So when my general contractor came back to me with a bid of $9,000 to paint the interior of my house, patch, tape, and sand all holes in the walls, I almost threw up in amazement. My house has some nice crown moldings and standard baseboards, but everything else is pretty normal. “$9,000 is a great price,” he said with a serious face.

Because I thought $9,000 was ludicrously expensive, I declined his bid and found another fella I worked with in the past for $7,000. After he discovered I was going with another fella, my general contractor then came back to me and said I was wasting my money because these new guys he knows can paint my interior for only $5,800!

What the HELL! How is it possible that he honestly thought $9,000 was a good initial price when he now says he can do it for $3,200 less (36%) after I found someone else? Once again, he’s trying to make me feel bad for spending more than I should. He was hoping I’d take his bait at $9,000, and was gambling that I had no other resources. Little did he know that I’m the most resourceful person ever. If I am wronged, I will go to any length to fix the situation.

Everything began to unravel after this incident.