How To Convince Your Spouse To Work Longer So You Can Retire Earlier

Retiring early on the beachOne can either work hard for their wealth, inherit their wealth, or marry into wealth. No way is the right way to get rich. Although the most honorable way is probably getting wealthy with your own two hands.

When I wrote the post, “Stay At Home Men Of The World, UNITE!” in February of 2012, I was being a little silly. The post was just a fun way of forecasting life as a stay at home man as I sought to build my online media business. Two years later there’s still a huge bias against men who are stay at home dads or non-breadwinners. Men who work traditional day jobs love to poke fun at men who don’t. Women, on the other hand, don’t seem biased at all against men who don’t work. In fact, I know several men and women who don’t work who ended up being secret lovers!

One of the strategies to retiring early is to have a working spouse. I have a couple lady friends who retired at 32 and now enjoy playing tennis and drinking chamomile tea during the day at my club as their husbands work their private equity jobs. One lady worked in advertising, and the other lady worked in corporate retail. When I asked whether either of them missed working they laughed in unison and said, “Not at all!”

During my time away from Corporate America from 2012-2013, I also met a lot of guys at Golden Gate Park (where I also play tennis) who retired early because their spouses worked. They were a little older on the early retiree spectrum (40-50). One husband’s wife is a cardiologist at UCSF Hospital. Another guy’s girlfriend is an executive at Salesforce.com. No doubt both their partners are doing well. All of the early retiree guys employed nannies to take care of their children during the day so they could play tennis as well. Gotta love it.

Thanks to the strengthening equality of men and women in the work force, more men are able to break free from corporate bondage to live alternative lifestyles. Men can be the stay-at-home parent now. Men can drink beers at the country club after a round of golf with their buddies and not have to worry as much about money anymore. The equalization of the sexes for career advancement and pay have been a big boon for men as well.

In this article, I’d like to share some tips from early retirees who successfully convinced their spouse or partner to continue working so they don’t have to. 

Interview With Sarah Wood, Co-Founder Of Unruly Media On Advertising, Entrepreneurship, London

Sarah Wood Unruly Media Co-FounderAs I’m off to London this summer for business and Wimbledon, I thought it would be a good idea to interview Sarah Wood, Co-Founder of Unruly Media, a social video advertising platform based in London. Sarah has been voted UK Female Entrepreneur of the Year by the Growing Business Awards, one of 15 Women to Watch in Tech by Inc., one of 10 London-Based Entrepreneurs to Watch by Forbes, Digital Woman of the Year by RED Magazine, and a Rising Star in Computer Weekly’s Most Influential Women in UK IT. Rock star!

Sarah is kind enough to take us out to dinner and host us at their corporate apartment somewhere north of Canary Wharf while we are there. If you happen to be in London from June 20 to June 30th, I’m happy to get a drink at your local pub.

I first worked with Unruly Media a couple years ago on a couple car campaigns for BMW and Jeep (video for Veteran’s Day). I was introduced by Courtnay, who used to work at another advertising platform in San Francisco and who now works at Unruly. The world is small, so it’s always good to maintain good relationships over time. Everybody will eventually know everybody.

London is truly one of the world’s great international cities. The last time I was there was in 2011 and I chronicled how much I spent on food, transportation, and shelter. London makes Manhattan look cheap, and San Francisco feel like a developing nation in terms of costs.

Without further ado, here’s my interview with Sarah on entrepreneurship, advertising, video, and London!

From Debtor To Millionaire: How A Windfall Changed My Life

This is a guest post from J.D. Roth, who founded the blog Get Rich Slowly in 2006 and is the author of Your Money: The Missing Manual. I first met JD four years ago for lunch up in Portland when I was still working. By that time, J.D. was already a mini-celebrity in the personal finance world through his story telling abilities and topical focus of paying down debt and living a more frugal lifestyle. We came from opposite ends of the financial and topical spectrum, but as fate would have it, we’re in pretty similar boats now.

I admire J.D. because he is a “blogging purist” – someone who writes for the love of writing first, community second, and income a distant third. Instead of an interview, I asked J.D. to share his story of how he went from debtor living paycheck-to-paycheck to financially free in just a few short years. His latest project is a year-long course on how to master your money, which explains how to slash costs, properly budget, and boost income so that you can pursue early retirement and other goals. Please enjoy this great post about struggle, loss, change, and love. 

In The Beginning

My parents

I’m a lucky man, and I know it. But for a long time, it sure didn’t seem that way.

When I was a boy, my family was poor. We lived in a single-wide trailer house in rural Oregon. My father was often out of work. When he was unemployed, things were rough. We never went hungry, but sometimes we came close. More than once, we were bailed out by the kindness of other families in our church.

We didn’t always struggle. Sometimes my parents had money, at least for a little while. You see, my father was a serial entrepreneur. He was always starting businesses. Even when he had a job selling boxes or staplers or candy bars, he had something going on the side. Most of his businesses failed, but some succeeded.

In 1977, my father sold one business for $300,000. He was supposed to receive $5000 per month for fifteen years, which seemed like a lot of money at the time. To celebrate, he went out and bought an airplane, a sailboat, and a Kenwood stereo. Life was good — until the buyer went bankrupt. Because he hadn’t saved anything from the few payments, Dad was broke again. And unemployed. We were right back where we’d started.

This “famine or feast” pattern continued throughout my entire childhood. Most of the time, it was famine — not feast.

In the late 1980s, I went away to college. Because I knew my parents couldn’t help me pay for school, I took care of things myself. I was a good student with a lot of extracurricular activities: president of the computer club, national competitor in Future Business Leaders of America, editor of the school literary magazine, and so on. Plus I had terrific scores on the the PSAT and SAT. As a result, I earned a full-ride scholarship. I worked two or three or five jobs to pay for housing and to earn spending money.

During college, I developed a spending habit. In order to keep up with my friends, many of whom seemed to be rich (as I defined it at the time), I used credit cards. I began to carry debt. At first, I only owed a few hundred dollars, but by the time I graduated with a psychology degree, I had a few thousand dollars in credit-card debt.

After college, my debts continued to mount. I bought a new car. When I had money, I spent it. When I didn’t have money, I still spent it. By the middle of 1995, just four years after I’d graduated, I’d accumulated over $20,000 in credit-card debt. It got worse. In 2004, my consumer debt topped $35,000. I felt like I was drowning. (See: How Many Credit Cards Should I Have Until It’s Too Many?)

Interview With Bo Lu, CEO Of FutureAdvisor On Startup Life, Online Wealth Management, And More

Bo Lu, FutureAdvisorsI’m pleased to share an interview I did with Bo Lu, the CEO of FutureAdvisor. FutureAdvisor is an algorithmic money manager with sophisticated tools to help clients manage their money.

I was introduced to Bo through Sam Yount who used to work at Personal Capital as the VP of Marketing and now works at FutureAdvisor in the same capacity. Sam was the one who brought me in to Personal Capital’s Redwood City headquarters to speak to Bill Harris, CEO of Personal Capital and Jim Del Favero, CPO back in the summer of 2013 for an hour and a half. Now I’m fulfilling one of my bucket lists of working at a startup part-time thanks to Sam’s intro.

I invited Bo over to play tennis and chat about business in between games. I’m fascinated by the entrepreneur’s story and I hope you’ll find this interview insightful. Bo shares his thoughts about the future of the online wealth management business, immigrating to America, why he decided to leave his job at Microsoft, the Y Combinator experience, and more. 

How Much Do I Have To Make As An Entrepreneur To Replace My Day Job Income?

Entrepreneur Cash OnlyEntrepreneurship is great due to the high correlation between effort and success. If you want autonomy and believe you have what it takes to create income out of thin air, go for it! There’s nobody to blame for your failures, just like there’s nobody to reward but you for your victories.

Anybody who incessantly complains about their job should just give entrepreneurship a go – they will probably never complain again. A day job is a walk in the park compared to entrepreneurship because of the necessity to wear many different hats e.g. accountant, operations, marketing, sales, producer.

What I’d like to do in this post is provide a rough estimate of how much you have to make as an entrepreneur in order to make equivalent money as a worker bee. Hopefully this post will give you a better idea before taking a leap of faith. After all, you don’t want to quit your job and die alone do you? There’s no honey when you got no money.