Greedy Banker or Thoughtful Banker?

Turkish BacklavaMy friend is leaving his job of the past five years to work on his own start-up.  When he got an e-mail solicitation from his mortgage officer about whether she could come by his office with a set of boxed lunches for him and his colleagues, he told her “no thank you” because he was leaving.  He purposefully kept his plans vague and hoped she’d just leave him alone as he attends to his new life.

Instead, she came back with the following response,

I am sorry to hear that? When you land at another organization, please let me know.  Also, let me know if I can help through the transition. Since you are still on payroll, I always suggest putting a Line of Credit in place. And if you need a brokerage account to rollover your 401K, we can certainly assist.”

Pretty thoughtful right?  Or is it?  My friend responded,

Thanks.  It’s actually voluntary.  Doing my own thing.  I’ve got enough saved up for the next 8 years, so I don’t think I need a HELOC, unless the rates are super low.  Even then, I don’t need it because I have the cash.”

Seems like a nice way of saying he’s fine and does not need the banker’s help.  Instead, the banker comes back and says,

“I always suggest putting a line in place even if you have cash on hand. Especially since you are still on payroll as it makes the process much easier. I recommend investing your liquid savings in higher yields within your comfort zone and instead put a home equity line in place for say $100,000 to act as your emergency line.  If you need it it is there for you, if you don’t great it does not cost you anything.

At this point, my friend is starting to get annoyed.  He’s been polite about saying “no thank you” twice now, and yet the banker keeps on pushing.  She recommends my friend use his 8 years of excess liquidity to invest in riskier assets, so he can borrow money from the bank via his home to keep liquid!?!  This seems to make no sense.

“Sure, give me a risk free 4% yielding security and I’ll take out as big a Line of Credit as you want!”

No response from the banker yet, and it’s been a week………

Readers, do you think it’s wise for someone to take out a home equity line of credit when he is leaving his steady paying job, and already has 8 years worth of living expenses saved up?  Is the banker being thoughtful or just trying to make a commission off of my friend?  

Regards,

Sam

Photo: Turkish Delight & Backlava in Istanbul.  Someone ate more than half.  SD.

 

Credit Card Enlightenment: Track Your Expenses Wisely

I’ve decided to start a new series entitled, “Credit Card Enlightenment” revealing a portion of what I spend on a monthly basis from my personal credit card and any enlightenment that is found through the analysis.  This monthly series will be a good way to track expenses and keep things from getting out of control as peripheral income grows.  In other words, tracking credit card expenses is one way to battle lifestyle inflation.

The use of credit cards is critical in the way I spend.  I buy items with confidence knowing that I have 30 days interest free to pay it off.  I also like how credit cards provide reward programs and buyer protection in case of product dissatisfaction and fraud.  Finally, I do not like carrying much more than $80 in my wallet.  Credit cards are easily replaced if my wallet is lost or stolen, whereas cash is usually gone forever.

Besides my mortgage, my credit card is my largest monthly expense.  I own three cards: a corporate card for work, a corporate card for my online business, and a personal card.  The discretional spending really comes from my personal credit card, hence this card is what I will focus on in this post.  I try and put everything other than business expenses on my personal credit card because the credit card tracks all my expenses, provides free financing, and produces rewards points.

PERSONAL CREDIT CARD EXPENSES FOR NOVEMBER, 2011

Mortgage Refinance Strategies And Points You Should Understand

Alas, after 8 weeks my primary residence mortgage refinance is now done!  It took so long that I actually forgot I was refinancing my mortgage until the bank called to ask when I could meet the notary to sign all the documents.

The process was pretty painless since I refinanced with the same bank.  I sent them the general paper work such as my W2, bank asset statements,  and pay stubs.  They did one appraisal which took all of 20 minutes and all I had to do was wait four more weeks to get it done!  The refinance this year was much easier than the refinance in 2010, boding well for the thousands of others out there who are also looking to refinance their mortgages.

I learned some new things beyond the basics which you might find useful in your mortgage refinancing or initial mortgage application process.

MORTGAGE REFINANCE TIPS TO THINK ABOUT

Debt and Bankruptcy Go Together Like A Horse And Carriage

Debt and bankruptcy are two words most people frown upon.  After all, debt is usually the cause of bankruptcy followed by an excuse of a lack of income.  I look at debt as a key motivator.  Debt is something that has driven me to work harder.  Without debt, I would ironically feel a little empty making money because it doesn’t take much to make me happy.  Before buying rental properties 10 years ago, I sometimes questioned the point of working one’s entire life away.  It felt pointless logging onto a computer screen just to see your savings go up.

When you are single, you really don’t need that much money to survive.  Even in big cities like San Francisco, Manhattan, London, and Tokyo, $45,000 is enough to live a happy life as a single person.  There’s only so many fancy meals you can eat a year before you start getting sick of eating out.  Your Macbook and gigantic big screen LED TV should last you at least 4 years.  Meanwhile, the ladies love guys with bus passes since it shows that we are enviro-friendly and keep it real! A black Porsche 911 Turbo is so 2007.

So how does one go from a happy life to utter financial ruin?  Getting obnoxiously way over our heads in debt, that’s what.

BE CAREFUL WITH DEBT, IT MAY GET YOU DRUNK

What Would You Do With $250,000 Right Now?

Imagine waking up one morning to see a Genie at the foot of your bed with milk and cookies.  She grants you the wish of converting your future earnings or current illiquid net worth into $250,000 cash.

For example, say you were to work for 20 more years and earn a median income of $60,000 a year before taxes.  Instead of methodically saving 20% for the next two decades, you can get all that money right now.  Would you take it?  I bet most would say “yes” since it’s your money and the present value of a buck is greater now than later.

The big question is, what are you going to do with the $250,000?  The stock market is volatile, bonds are bubbliscious, and savings interest rates are less than 0.2%!  Perhaps you’ll use some of the money to pay off your debts, further your education, and help out your loved ones.  Or maybe you’ll invest the money in your start-up company and watch it grow into the multi-millions.

Finally, maybe you’ll do absolutely nothing with the $250,000 and just keep it liquid for a rainy day.  The political landscape is pretty horrific as there’s no way the Jobs Act Bill will get passed since it attacks charities and municipal bonds which fund state construction.  Massive layoffs are imminent before the holidays despite cashed up corporate balance sheets because demand is uncertain.  You might very well be in for rough times, and that $250,000 + $1,600/month in unemployment insurance will help you get through!

Genies are appearing in front of many homeowner’s beds thanks to Ben Bernanke and the Fed’s low interest rate policy.  Few people would have ever expected the 10-year yield to drop below 2%, but it has.  Cash-out mortgage refinances are tempting people night and day now, but the party can’t last forever.  Ben’s nickname is “Helicopter Ben” for making it rain money.  I prefer to call him “Bengenie.”

WHAT I’D DO WITH $250,000 OF MY OWN MONEY (REMEMBER, IT’S NOT FREE MONEY!)

* Look for attractive 8%+ yielding 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom rental properties.

* Decide which municipal bond ETFs to buy.  Examples: CMF, CXA, HYMB, INY, ITM, PVI, NYF, PWZ, PWA, SHM, SMB, SFI.

* Invest $10-20,000 into the Yakezie Network for better user experience, interface, etc.

* Look for offshore high yielding, but stable assets given the USD will likely continue to remain weak or depreciate.

* Send $15,000 to my parents to help contribute to their home remodeling project.  Good luck guys!

* Do absolutely nothing with all leftover funds and wait for a potential recession to come when Obama gets re-elected.  There could be much better opportunities in the stock markets as a result.

Readers, what are some of the considerations before accepting the Genie’s wish? 

What would you do with an extra $250,000?

Regards,

Sam

Attacking Your Debt From All Angles

The following is a guest post by Jasmine from Check N’ Go.

With the miserable state of the economy today, some are desperate to find ways to reduce their debt without filing bankruptcy or losing their home and savings.  The sad reality for many is that bankruptcy and foreclosure are the only events on their financial horizon.

In order to attack debt and free yourself from financial woes, it’s going to require some creative use of existing resources and changing the way you approach debt reduction.

Change Your Habits