Treat Your Job As If You Won The Lottery

Do you hit the snooze button multiple times in the morning because you just don’t want to work?  While at work, do you daydream of being somewhere else?  Well too bad!  You’ve won the lottery and you don’t even realize it!

Let’s say you make $50,000 a year.  Divide your income by the current 4% risk free rate of return and you get $1,250,000!  In other words, if you have $1,250,000 sitting in the bank right now earning a 4% rate of return, you’re making your current salary of $50,000 a year.  Not bad winning $1,250,000 huh?  Now take your income, and divide it by 4% (0.04) and let me know how much you’ve won!

It doesn’t matter what job you have now.  Just know that the job you do have is coveted by a tremendous amount of people.  This includes my first job mopping McDonald’s egg bits at 6am.  My manager told me I was lucky to wear the purple and black (colors of the uniform) because he turned down 8 other candidates over the past month.  I just felt lucky I could stuff my face with as many FREE apple pies when he wasn’t looking!

WHINE AND CHEESE

What is it about the water cooler that attracts the whining crowd?  I swear, every time I go to the pantry to get a drink of water, all I hear are folks complaining about someone, or some aspect of the job they hate.

“I can’t believe Jerry is taking time off from work right now when we are so busy!”

“How come he gets a raise and I don’t?”

“I might as well be working for peanuts with the bonus they gave me!”

“Can’t believe we hired that dimwit.  What was he thinking?”

There’s one colleague who literally complains in French for 45 minutes everyday non-stop!  It’s like Pavlov’s Dog.  As soon as we hear her French, we’re conditioned to think she’s complaining even though we don’t understand a word she’s saying.  Complaining is like an infectious disease that invades that permeates and breaks teams apart.  It’s got to stop!

IF ONLY PEOPLE KNEW HOW GOOD THEY HAVE IT

One in ten people are out of work, and there are plenty more who would HAPPILY do your job for less.  Despite double-digit unemployment, misery pervades.  Some blame it on having to do more work for the same pay since there are 10% less people to help contribute.  Others think their jobs are beneath them.  Well if that’s the case, just move!

Job hopping is a common phenomenon at the beginning of the year.  The interesting thing is that once a hopper, always a hopper.  You can see resumes with five jobs in as many years, making you wonder what the heck is wrong with the person.  More times than not, it’s because the candidate always believes the other side is better.  There comes a breaking point where an employer will stop giving you the benefit of the doubt for jumping around so much, and then you’re stuck in oblivion.

Every now and again, I get the case of “Greener Grass Syndrome.”  I wonder what it’s like to do something else, or be someone else.  Oh how wonderful they’ve got it.  Then I snap back to reality and count my blessing with my existing employer.  Everything is relative, and it’s important to treat your existing job as if you hit the big one.

CONCLUSION

If you have a job, just know that you are the winner among a large pool of quality candidates.  Once you change your mindset, you’ll stop complaining and start flourishing again.

Readers, why do you think some workers complain so much about their jobs even during times of economic stress?  Do you think men and women complain equally as much?  With the economy still in a fragile state, why don’t people realize how good they have it?

* The risk free rate of return is simply the amount of money you can earn risk free.  4% is used because you can earn 4% in an FDIC-insured 5-yr CD currently.  The 10-yr yield is also considered a RFR at 3.65%.  Yes, we have to do something at our jobs to make money unlike the interest income from savings.  That said, I’m trying to highlight a different mindset so disgruntled workers stop taking their jobs for granted.

Regards,

Sam @ Financial Samurai – “Slicing Through Money’s Mysteries”

Follow on Twitter @FinancialSamura and subscribe to our RSS or E-mail feed.

Sam started Financial Samurai in 2009 during the depths of the financial crisis as a way to make sense of chaos. After 13 years working on Wall Street, Sam decided to retire in 2012 to utilize everything he learned in business school to focus on online entrepreneurship.

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Comments

  1. david m says

    Sam,

    I just have to say GREAT POST! This post should be mandatory reading for ALL.

    “With the economy still in a fragile state, why don’t people realize how good they have it?” – there’s a billion dollar question for which I have no answer.

  2. Moneyreasons says

    To be honest, I think many people complain just to have something to talk about. The problem is after too much whining, we start to believe it.

    I fell into this trap every so often, and then I have to effectivly reboot myself so that I’m more stress free…

    If you can get an office with no whiners, that would be heaven, but unfortunately, it’s typically not that way.

    I wonder how much more productive businesses would be without the whining segment? Whining drags down moral, and creates a stressful environment…

    Nice article Sam

    • Money Reasons says

      Hmmm, my comment still hold true today as it did back then in March.

      I will add that, I also think people complain because sometimes they look at their work life and start to see a lack accomplishment. This is depressing, so they complain…

      So they start to dream the little dream of a better job where they fit a little tighter (after all, we are all cogs of some sort), and the business depends on them a bit more.

      I guess we all can’t be rock stars though… at least not at our primary job! That’s why I’m starting to value the little blogging gig I have going on.

      While it’s not much in the way of money, It’s something that I have total control over! Money Reason is me, my thoughs, my time and efforts… Nirvana of sorts!

      • admin says

        Don-san, I hear you 100% on loving the autonomy of our blogs. I love the fact we can do what we wish with our sites! From marketing, to content creation, to revenue generation. It’s 100% what we put into it!

        Anybody who has an entrepreneur itch should go and start a blog. It’s so much fun, and a “Nirvana of sorts” like you say!

  3. Sandy L says

    What a great post! Americans have such a sense of entitlement. Those of us who are employed are very lucky.

  4. Little House says

    My situation is a little different. As a sub teacher who would like a full time job (the vacation benefits are terrific, by the way!) I can’t stand to hear teachers complain about “how dumb” their class is. For instance, one particular teacher (who I’m subbing for right now as I type) has been complaining ALL YEAR about her class being the “low ones”. (I guess that’s why I’m subbing for her now, she’s near retirement and done for the year I think.) From my personal perspective, her kids aren’t low, they just haven’t been challenged.

    So why do teachers complain about the students? Same reason people complain about their jobs, the grass is always greener syndrome. But for teachers, it’s always that the other grade level teacher has the “bright ones.” I think I agree with Money Reasons, it gives them something to talk about!
    .-= Little House´s last blog ..Yakezie Group Round-Up =-.

    • Jason @ MyMoneyMinute says

      Maybe you should remind them that they get 180 days off each year! LOL

      I’m in a similar situation as you, but on the legal side. I’m an attorney looking for full-time work, but do project work to pass the time. There’s lots of complaining on my projects, but honestly, most of it is self-deprecating humor.
      .-= Jason @ MyMoneyMinute´s last blog ..Wine On A Budget: Oak Creek =-.

  5. Evan says

    Great post! I never understood it either. I hate when I used to have to go to Court (for work not that late saturday night) and you run into these MISERABLE CLERKS. I always thought to myself life is way too short to be that miserable all the time.

    I think this all has to do with human nature and the urge to be better (however that is defined by the person) and the realization that it won’t be done.
    .-= Evan´s last blog ..My Favorite Saying and a Cool New Personal Finance Blogging Group =-.

  6. Geek says

    Sensei, you know I love my job. This post does me no good!

    Things can always be better but remember, commiserating with coworkers is fun. The dance of “my job is so tough” sympathy is just part of office life.

  7. Monevator says

    I like comparing salary to a passive income stream – I do this myself all the time.

    Some people though are just allergic to jobs and being told what to do. I’m definitely one of them. I’m thrilled still after a decade to be out of the 9-5 office life, even though I occasionally miss the office banter.

    From my experience in offices though I fully agree with you — most people don’t know how lucky they are. Most of them wouldn’t survive 2 days fending for themselves as freelancers or with a start-up business.
    .-= Monevator´s last blog ..Buffett: Why the property bubble bursting was a good thing =-.

    • admin says

      That’s a great way of looking at things… salary to passive income! I’m assuming the greater the passive income percentage the better if the entire pie is growing bigger.

      Tell me more about being out of the office life. Didn’t realize it, or did I? What is your primary source of income?

      • Monevator says

        I deliberately keep it murky because I want to maintain the split between my work life and my mysterious double-life as a super-blogger in a cape. Or something! Similar to you I guess.

        It’s a mix of things, a combination of small freelance jobs and ongoing consultancy for 4-6 clients. Plus a bit of share trading (which just gets lobbed back into the Monevator hoard) plus of course my ongoing residual income stream from investments, which also gets re-invested into the hoard!

        Plus $1 a day from blogging of course! ;) (Okay, making a bit more from blogging now, but it’s still about 1/20th of the same time/effort to day job work).
        .-= Monevator´s last blog ..Volatility, inflation, and asset class returns =-.

        • admin says

          Ahhh, a man of many skills and income sources! You should write about they more on day, and create a pie chart for all to see! You can just lable the income something random!

          I’m sure you’re making at least $2/day from blogging, so stop being modest! lol.

          “Ongoing residual income from investments” sounds like you are already a super wealthy man!

          Pls buy me some steak and eggs next time I’m in London OK? Thnx.

  8. Money Funk says

    “The interesting thing is that once a hopper, always a hopper.” Maybe true, but responsibility has caused me to holt and stay put now for… 6 years. And yes, many time I feel this way, “There comes a breaking point where an employer will stop giving you the benefit of the doubt for jumping around so much, and then you’re stuck in oblivion.”

    I think hopping is because I don’t want to settle for less. Hopping until I find the perfect fit for me. I know doubt will hop again, but it will be to start my own business. I have a pretty cushy career right now that I wouldn’t give up for anything less.

    Nice perspective on things in this post. ;)
    .-= Money Funk´s last blog ..Introducing Ally Interest Checking =-.

    • admin says

      Awesome! 6 years is a long time. A lot of us have to hop around until we can find that ideal scenario. I think after 4-5 years at one place, you’re free to hop around again!

  9. FinEngr says

    FS – you are a math magician! I love how you take common numbers, do your vodoo, and give us a completely new perspective.

    A few notes…
    Workplace complaining IS dangerously infectous and like quicksand – the more you fight it, the more trapped you become. Like quicksand, the only escape is through support. Using something else to brace and pull yourself out of the muck.

    Until we all have jobs where we do zero work and get paid millions per month, complaining will always be prevalent. “More for less” should be our US motto. Reminds me of a simpson’s episode, Homer visits a hospital and says, “THIS guy has a machine that breathes FOR him? And here I am using my lungs like a SUCKER!”

    On the statistic…
    Wouldn’t load, but is that still the current US average? Of course, I won’t argue the number, but only pose the question do we know the breakdown by industry? While construction/real estate could be 3/10 unemployment, doctors/accountants could be 0/10.

    As David (MBA Briefs) will likely comment on, this then would be a flushing of the system to make more efficient.
    .-= FinEngr´s last blog ..Financial Lessons From Engineering =-.

    • admin says

      Great Homer Simpson quote! haha. Anything beyond basic math for me, and I’m lost. So I’m glad you like the voodoo! It’s just a change in mindset. When we change how we look at things for the better, we gain a great deal more.

  10. oilandgarlic says

    Thanks for the reminder. Some people are miserable at their job for good reason; I do give them the benefit of the doubt at first. Maybe their boss is terrible or they’re under-appreciated, etc.. But after a while, you just have to avoid the whiners. They drag you down.

    I wrote some posts about how to avoid becoming the bitter old person in the corner cubicle ( you know the type!) and got some interesting responses. I realized that I am fortunate to have a good work environment and others are not as fortunate or less pro-active or more “stuck” due to family obligations and mortgages.
    .-= oilandgarlic´s last blog ..Food Heaven =-.

    • admin says

      Feel free to paste your links in your comments I don’t mind at all. It helps navigate! Would like to have a read on avoiding being a bitter old person ;)

  11. LeanLifeCoach says

    If I could afford to I’d pay for the privilege of doing my job. I really love it that much. Admittedly I am a complainer. I complain about all the crap I hear about our company from people that are unwilling to do anything about it. If you are not going to take action then shut up!

    I really think most people complain because it allows them to avoid recognizing their own faults. Last year, for a period of time, people around me were appreciative but then they became acclimated to it. Today they are right back to their complaining ways! So soon we forget.
    .-= LeanLifeCoach´s last blog ..5 Ways People Waste Money =-.

    • admin says

      Wow, you would PAY to do your job? Now I’m really envious, as you’ve got it MADE!

      Complaining not to recognize their own faults, that could be! Insightful. So soon we forget indeed.

      I enjoyed your latest post on wasting money Greg-san.

  12. Kevin Khachatryan says

    Why don’t we look at the other side of things. Some workers are qualified for their position and have experience matching that necessary for the job. There companies reap the benefits of their primed skills.

    People are saying that we should be lucky that we have jobs. But we aren’t. Most people have to work hard and go to school for those JOBS. It’s not luck, it’s dedication.

    Even in an economic turmoil where the unemployment rate is at 10%+, large corporations don’t want to let go of their best workers. And these best workers should never feel that their job is more important than their happiness.
    .-= Kevin Khachatryan´s last blog ..15 Simple Ways to Make Extra Money =-.

    • admin says

      Yes, it’s a symbiotic relationship worker and company. I can take once in a while complaining, but not incessant complaining!

      Some have lost their jobs through no fault of their own i.e. a company going bankrupt, some senior corrupt official scandal etc. We need to empathisize.

  13. Forest says

    I think it’s all about scapegoating and the innate human want for new experiences… afteralll we got done with earth (well most of it) and we are having a crack at space now… Human’s want new experiences like it’s a drug to fuel the next high…. The daily grind of work just does not do that for many of us but we are too embedded in society to change it.

    As for scapegoating I mean that the fact that something is not content within scapegoats itself onto immediate surroundings… often this is the work place.

    I’ve been through it and I finally cracked. I decided I would not do something if I moaned too much about it, or I would quit moaning and look at it from a 3rd person to assess how much of a deal it really was.

    Say you have to stuff 20k envelopes…. So what! No stress, just pop headphones on and go…. The old me would have been very negative about such a task.

    Gladly I don’t have to do stuff like that anymore as I work online for myself, but I do have mundane things such as link building for sites, writing articles on subjects that I am a little sick of, etc etc, doing some undesirable client design work… So occassionally I still moan but I try and remind myself of how lucky I am to be where I am… I live in Egypt, I work on the internet and I finally have a reasonable handle of my cashflow (no savings yet but getting there).

    Sorry I rambled a bit :), thanks for an awesome article.

    Forest.
    .-= Forest´s last blog ..Get Over The Fear Of Cooking At Home… =-.

    • admin says

      Hey Forest, all rambling is welcome here! That is pretty darn neat you live in Egypt, and are pretty much location-independent with your job it seems. Very inspirational and exciting to do. I’d love to read more about your adventure!

      Also, are you paid to help a site link build? It all seems so foreign to me. Best, Sam

      • Forest says

        I’m paid for graphics and wordpress coding mostly. Occasionally I get jobs which include promotion, backlink strategies and search engine optimization.
        .-= Forest´s last blog ..Cut The Fat – Losing Things You Don’t Need =-.

        • admin says

          Very cool! You have two skills which I have NONE of! haha. There is a Yakezie Google Groups if you’d like to join. The discussion is robust. Your work will probably be part of the 2nd challenge in 5 months, when we’re all good and ready. I don’t want people over thinking links and SEO right now. Would love to get your future insight!
          .-= admin´s last blog ..Sometimes Saving Money Is About Principle =-.

  14. David @ MBA briefs says

    Sorry I’m a little late weighing in on this topic, which is pretty timely for me. The whining and complaining where I work is at an all-time high, and I would love to forward your post to everyone in my department and tell them it was mandatory reading.

    Most of the guys in my department make really good money for the area (sub-6 figures and over) and don’t have bachelors degrees, just formal certifications. When I hear them complaining about money it’s all I can do to keep from screaming.

    It creates a really lousy work environment when everyone’s unhappy about something or other all the time.
    .-= David @ MBA briefs´s last blog ..How long are you going to live? =-.

  15. The Rat says

    A good paying job with benefits is not an easy thing to come by, and a lot of people take that for granted. At the same time however, some employers instill negative work environments, and I can see why many people leave positions for lower paying jobs just to keep a piece of their sanity.

    Nice thread
    .-= The Rat´s last blog ..BIN Revisited: From Tantrum to Tantalization =-.

    • admin says

      Do you really think employers purposefully instill a negative work environment though? That can’t be true, can it? Maybe there’s one rally bitter boss who is like a cancer, but I don’t think the corporate culture is purposefully like that. But perhaps.

      What a great redesign of your site, Rat. Nice.

  16. The Rat says

    @FS – I would like to think that the vast majority of employers do not purposefully instill a negative work environment but sometimes do by having a lack of good systems in place. Did you hear about the company in France that is being investigated because so many of the employees have committed suicide? I’m not saying the employer is directly responsible here (although it could prove to be the case) and this is ‘allegedly speaking’, its just that because people spend so much time at work, its important that the ‘workplace’ is positive ‘enough’.

    On a side note, thanks for the props on my site; its greatly appreciated and I’m appreciative of your presence there. I want in on the challenge man…let me in! I left a comment on that huge thread :0)
    Just waiting for the green light to post the thread
    Cheers
    .-= The Rat´s last blog ..BIN Revisited: From Tantrum to Tantalization =-.

    • admin says

      Hi Rat – Lack of good systems is a good term. I did read about that company in France with suicides. That’s nuts! Imagine if you were the HR person there or tried to recruit people!

      Welcome to the Yakezie Challenge! I see your badge, and your round ups, and everything. We’d be happy to have you on board. Shoot me your e-mail address and I’ll have Greg-san from Eliminate The Muda be in touch. Let me respond to the original thread, as that’s where they are tracking too.

      thnx

  17. The Rat says

    Perfect, will do! And thanks.
    .-= The Rat´s last blog ..BIN Revisited: From Tantrum to Tantalization =-.

  18. Joseph | kickdebtoff.com says

    A good reminder about being grateful. It’s easy to complain about how we hate our jobs – even when we really do and miss the fact that there are many that are looking for something to do.

  19. oilandgarlic says

    I was hesitant to post links back to my blog but since you said it’s okay, here goes:

    http://oilandgarlic.wordpress.com/2010/02/19/say-no-to-bitterness-tips-to-improve-your-9-to-5-work-life/

    Hope I did this right since I’m new to blogging.

    You might wonder why a food/simple living blogger writes so much about career/finance. I just think that too many simple living bloggers focus only on saving money and not enough on making money, investing, negotiations, and career. Without some money-savvy, they’re never going to achieve the simple life that they want. IMO, negotiations is the most important skill because there will always be people and companies that will take advantage, or benefit from, a person’s ignorance and/or lack of negotiating skills. Even if you plan to move to the countryside someday (the pinnacle of the simple living dream), it’s important to know how to negotiate!
    .-= oilandgarlic´s last blog ..Simple Joys…Coffee Breaks =-.

    • admin says

      Sure, link away, it’s no problem here. Will have a read! Yes, saving money is actually the easy way. Making money is the harder route!

  20. MossySF says

    The reality is for 90% of people, their expenses rise to match their income. So no matter how good they have it, it’s little difference to another job paying 2/3rds the amount (other than the shock of making the adjustment back down). And the corollary is 90% of the eager replacements for a job would soon be just as bitter once their lifestyle adjusts.

    Those who can break out of this mentality of course may standard better chances for advancement. (Although many who can break out often strikes out on their own anyways.)
    .-= MossySF´s last blog ..Tour group vacations =-.

  21. George says

    Ooo, a recycled post, but worthwhile!

    Here’s another fun “lottery number” calculation: Take your YTD taxable investment proceeds and divide by your hourly salary. In other words, if I was paid to invest, then I’ve “worked” 400 hours so far this year.

    Coming at it from another direction, if I’d worked on the investing 16 hours per weekend, then I’m making an hourly wage 40% higher than my working hourly wage.

    _Now_ I can complain that I’m not being paid enough at work, LOL.

  22. Andrew Hallam says

    Another good post Sam,

    I think you’ll enjoy reading Daniel Goleman’s book, Social Intelligence. He suggests that our internal level of satisfaction is somewhat hard-wired, no matter what happens to us (or no matter how subjectively “great” or “lousy” our job might be)

    Whiners will always whine. Even if they win the lottery, they will whine shortly after the buzz subsides. Their levels of content can be bumped a bit, short term, but no matter what happens to them, they’ll gravitate back to their hard-wired level of content–or lack thereof.

    Generally happy people are the opposite. Even after experiencing some kind of paralysis, they eventually return to a level of “happiness” that is close to (but not quite) where they were before paralysis (or unemployment, if you want to use that as a far less severe example)

    People can change a bit, sure, but according to Goleman, we’re mostly hard-wired.

    Pity the woman mumbling in French. It’s too bad our attributes weren’t all dolled out equally at birth.

    • admin says

      Hi Andrew, I’ll check out Goleman’s book. Maybe we are 70% wired, but I don’t believe we’re 90-100% wired at all. We can all improve ourselves and our attitudes in some way.

      I’m thankfully I have a happy disposition. I think I smile so much my jaw and cheek muscles get tired!

  23. Charlie says

    I found myself grumbling about my 4 year old job a LOT in Q1 of this year. I was bored, unsatisfied, felt underpaid, and was annoyed with some of the people I was working with. Then in Q2 I decided to start looking for a new job that would be a refreshing, new challenge for me. Man! Boy did I forget so much in the last 4 years – searching for a job sucks! Not only did I forget how much time it takes, I forgot how competitive it is too. And on top of that, none of the jobs descriptions I stumbled across really wowed me with their duties or compensation. Feeling foolish and humbled, I took a step back and reevaluated my current job. I realized I was choosing to be bored, that my salary really wasn’t as terrible as I thought it was, and it wasn’t that bad overall either. I decided to turn things around and give it another go. If my negative thoughts come back again I’ll reevaluate things then and probably start looking for a new job but for now I feel a lot better.

    • admin says

      You know, it’s great that you took the step to do something about your situation and look for a new job!

      As soon as we look for something else, we are able to compare and appreciate the good and bad of what we have.

      Sit tight, focus on the positives of your current job, and look aggressively next year if you wanna change!

  24. Moneyedup says

    What a great perspective! I am a recent university grad looking for a full time job, and have felt pretty crumby about my summer job where I work for minimum wage. After reading your article, I am feeling better about my situation because I feel lucky to have at least found a summer job when so many students this summer did not. Always look on the bright side of life!

    • admin says

      Hi Mate, really glad the post helps you feel better and keep things in perspective. It’s still a little brutal out there for summer internships and jobs, so definitely count yourself lucky!

  25. Kevin@InvestItWisely says

    Sam,

    You’ve really been hitting the nail on the head with your posts recently! I have to admit that I’m one of those that have been complaining from time to time, but you’re right, I should count my blessings. Nonetheless, human nature is to compare yourself with those in similar shows, not those much worse off than you are. We could compare ourselves to the worst of the worst to make ourselves feel better, but is this really productive?

    I do think that complaining is often counterproductive, unless done with an aim and an end in mind. If you’re complaining and all you’re doing is dragging down the spirit of your team, then keep it to yourself!

    P.S. I think 4% is a bad interest rate to use, since work requires you to put in 45+ hours a week. I still get the point you were trying to make, though. Looking forward to the next post!

    • admin says

      Kevin, you make it sound like I haven’t been hitting the nail on the head with the other posts then? j/k.

      Complaining is infectious.. a disease. Stop complaining folks and do something about it!

      The irony of 4% is that’s a conservative number. Now the number is more like 3.5% for a risk free rate of return or 3%. Take the $50,000 example, and divide it by 3.5% and you get even more money of $1.423 million bucks!

      Whatever we are making, it’s worth MORE the lower the risk free rate goes. Yihaw!

      • Kevin says

        Sam! :o That is the kind of trick my gf plays on me whenever I say that she looks pretty :S

        p.s. You can give me 1.5 million over working for 50k a year anytime ;)

        • admin says

          Haha, nice. Smart girlfriend!

          The only trade I will make is giving you $1.5 million, if you give me $80,000 a year for the rest of your life. I’m down with 5%, and you have to castrate yourself if you fail to pay!

          Cool?

  26. Darwin's Money says

    Timely. I just watched “Up in the Air”. Yeah, I did that post on passing on a 90% pay raise – it was all about family, security, and inability to take risks at this point in my life. I’d probably be either miserable or seeking new employment by now given what happened to the company. It’s good now and then to take a moment for some perspective. Thanks for reminding us both how shitty it is for so many people and to STFU next time the company cuts back on cookies at lunch meetings or the you don’t get to have your own printer anymore. There’s some serious shit goin’ on out there.

    • admin says

      Passing up on a 90% pay raise is tough! What if they guaranteed you a 90% pay raise over last year’s income for two years in a row? Would ya do it? Curious to know!

      BTW, I do believe Investing is all luck. The Samurai Fund is kicking butt and it’s 10000% luck!

      • Darwin's Money says

        Hah! too funny, you lucky devil. No the 90% was total comp, much of which was higher bonus range mixed w higher salary. Risky though. Smaller company, heading up a new group. Tons of travel, would have to move. and in the end, just not worth it.

  27. Jeremy Johnson says

    Hi Sam, you certainly put an interesting spin on things. I used to be a complainer about work. “Work Sucks” was my number one phrase in the past.

    Thankfully now I’ve cured myself with a simple change in my attitude. Now my philosophy is simply this, “What is the maximum reach and value I can offer while at my job.” What a life change this simple philosophical change has been for me.

  28. myfinancialobjectives says

    I think people complain so much about their work because 1. A lot of pople don’t like their jobs. and 2. People “need” something to complain about. That’s one thing I noticed about American culture, we are generally unhappy people. Well, I make that statement because my girlfriend is trinidadian and when I go to visit her in Trinidad, the first thing I notice is how generalyl HAPPY everyone is. Normal conversations end up with 10x more laughs and joy than american ones. I got used to that way of life, and when I returned, I was literally slightly depressed because of how….drab our mentality is!

    I also posted a topic about this entitiled: “Appreciate your job”. I posted it due to an incident where a coworker was almost first and I started to imagine what would I do if I were fired. Scary stuff, I like to think I am very grateful, but then agani, I love my job!:)

    • admin says

      Good point! Whenever I go overseas, and especially to the Tropics, people are WAY more jovial there! Feel free to include the link to your “Appreciate Your Job” post. I have a very open policy on folks posting up links.

      What is your job again? No worries if it’s private.

  29. Financial bondage says

    lucky to wear the purple and black? lol

    retail and fast food have high turnover rates usually, so their will always be jobs in those areas. Low paying jobs. Who can live on $8/hour? Only a kid living at home with no bills. Most adults could not live on that.

    • admin says

      Yeah, man….. Purple and Black 4 life! lol.

      I made $3.25 an hour that summer. Kinda sucked, but still allowed me the independence to buy whatever I wanted as a teenager. Taught me discipline, working together in a team, and how to avoid/impress tyrant managers!

  30. youngandthrifty says

    Woow! $3.25 per hour at McDonalds? Hey are you dating yourself? =) They say that McDonalds is a great place for a first job. You learn about efficiency, working as a team, discipline (like you say above).

    Yeah, I think people complain too much. Period. I think I can be guilty of that too… If we all were happy with what we have already, the world would be a much much better place. =)

    • admin says

      Big time money eh? However, I’m not sure what you are asking about whether I am dating myself? Sometimes I take myself out for a milkshake, I admit it!

  31. Dolla Thug says

    Seriously…I really need to be thankful for the job that I do have – I try to catch myself when I start annoying myself with my own whining. There are a lot of people that would love my $50K annuity payments on my $1.25 million lottery winnings. :)

    It’s just really hard facing that rat race everyday…sitting in a cube every business day, 8-9 hours a day…not something I’m trying to do for 40 years+ of my life so I just have to be thankful for what I have now and work REALLY HARD on my plan B WITHOUT complaining until I can escape the cubicle cage! One day………..

  32. valletta says

    I owned my own profitable business, sold it in 2007. Was unemployed for 2 loooooong years (never been unemployed in my LIFE). My husband was unemployed for 1 year. We lived off savings and racked up 50,000 in debt when we exhausted savings.

    I am now working (at my old employer, best company in the world!) and I pinch myself daily, I am so lucky. I’m making incredible money, love my job, love my boss. We were about 2 months away from missing a mortgage payment. I had suicidal thoughts, which I’ve shared with no one until this post. My heart goes out to the millions of Americans out of work based on predatory and corrupt corporatist policies (outsourcing, stagnant compensation, overpaid CEOs, etc (another rant).

    Do I love my job so much because I was so close to the edge?? I’m sure it’s part of it.
    I will never take employment for granted again. Never.

    I thank my

  33. Self-described complainer says

    While I don’t think everyone should be whining all of the time, as someone who was recently laid off from a horrible work environment (and sad as it was, it was a total relief), I can say that sometimes people complain for a reason.

    I worked in a small department of an otherwise okay organization, and my director was awful (I will not go into examples). Everyone in our department would, yes, complain daily about him, mostly to each other. Few outside of our department knew of the internal turmoil. I can only imagine the author of this post referring to us as I read it. “Oh, it’s not that bad…oh, they could be unemployed…oh, get over it…” Daily, our director would remind us that “you’re lucky you have a job” while generally being a jerk. I think that sort of thinking is the problem. Eventually we all left, and even the people who were laid off were relieved at not having to go into a toxic environment everyday.

    Yes, complainers might be lucky to have a paycheck. But that does not excuse poor work environments, and the daily berating by a supervisor. Remember that sometimes complainers are complaining for a reason.

    • Financial Samurai says

      Complainers are always complaining for a reason. But, after a certain amount of time, if you aren’t moving on to do something else, then it’s their fault, and not the organization.

      There is no place in an organization for jerks. In fact, we have a “no jerk policy”!

      I hope you get unemployment insurance and find yourself a better job in the future!

      Thanks for stopping by. Hope to see you around.

      Best, Sam

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