How To Get Hired If You Are Overqualified Or Don’t Need The Money

Overqualified For A Job, Occupy Wall StreetConvincing your spouse to allow you to go on a trip with friends to Vegas is easy compared to convincing an employer to hire you if you’re overqualified, too old, or don’t need the money. Finding any type of work is like dating. The older you get, unfortunately, the harder it seems to find a match.

But just like dating, finding that perfect someone is often hilarious, frustrating, expensive, and sometimes painful. Let me share with you a short story about one company I met with a while ago where I failed to find a connection.

Sweet (Or Sweat) Dreams Of Becoming A Millionaire Again

Daydreaming by Brynja Eldon Flickr CCIn 2013, my income took a big hit. The glow of a six figure severance paid out in 2012 was no more, and I didn’t have a job to pay my bills. All I had was my passive income and a tiny salary I drew from my online media company. I had no desire to pay the employee and employer’s FICA + Medicare tax of 12.4% as an employer employee. Instead, I’d rather take distributions, which are free from such taxes with an S-Corp. Unfortunately, the IRS isn’t stupid and wants to see a balanced income/distribution ratio.

I’ve always thought I was way too lucky to deserve the income I earned during my career in finance. All I did was study hard, get on a 6am bus to a career fair in Washington DC, and interview well enough to land a job that paid well. Nobody from The College of William & Mary, a non-target state school, gets a front office job at Goldman Sachs WHQ. Luck can be the only explanation.

No matter how many times you hear of high income earners going bankrupt, if you are making at least $100,000 a year, it’s relatively easy to become a millionaire. Working in finance almost felt like cheating. You not only gain extensive knowledge to make better financial decisions for yourself, you are also paid handsomely.

When I began looking for other employment opportunities outside of finance, I realized just how good the finance industry pays. It’s very hard to find jobs in tech/internet that pay over $250,000 a year. But in investment banking, practically every 27 year old Associate makes such an amount. Many CEOs in other industries doesn’t even get paid that much.

Median Income By Age And Sex In America

median-salary-by-age-and-sexDo Americans have an earnings problem or a savings problem? Unfortunately, I think we’ve got both. Take a look at the median salary by age and sex compiled by Motley Fool from the Census Bureau.

The obvious points are 1) people make more the older they get and 2) men make more than women at every single age group. Making more as you age is nothing insightful. What is insightful is how the difference between men and women’s salaries really start to grow in their 30s. A 25% pay gap is huge!

So what’s going on here? The answer must be biological (life). For example, I have a female friend who was the most gung-ho worker ever. She was an Electrical Engineer in college (one of the hardest majors) and told me that she planned to work “forever” after Harvard Business School. Two years after HBS, she was pregnant, and when I asked her whether she still planned to go back to work she said, “No way! Raising my children is the most important thing in the world to me.”

It’s been five years since she’s been out of the work force. If she decides to return at age 37, it’s logical to assume that she will have to start at a lower pay and title than colleagues who kept working while she was away. Regarding finding a solution to the gender wage gap for equal pay for equal work, the fix I’ve come up with is to have equal paternity leave rights for men and women. With equal paternity leave rights, employers are more blind to discriminate.

What’s interesting is that women have more money in their 401k on average up to the $150,000 income mark, according to a 2014 report by Fidelity Investments with 13 million tracked accounts. Women earning between $20,000 and $40,000, for example, have saved an average of $17,300 in their 401(k) compared to $15,200 for men in the same income range.

Career Advice: If You Fake It, You Will Probably Not Make It

Fake Ice Cubes: Can you tell?

Fake or real?

There’s been a huge trend towards joining startups and fast growing tech companies ever since Wall Street blew up between 2008-2010. The top companies to work for no longer are dominated by the Goldmans, Mckinseys, and Bains of the world. The Googles, Facebooks, and thousands of startups you’ve never heard of are the employers of choice now.

One of the biggest realizations I’ve had going from an enormous investment bank to consulting for various startups is that if you fake it, you probably won’t make it for very long. When you’re at a huge organization, it’s easy to hide behind bureaucracy, layers of middle management, and massive amounts of inefficiencies. If you stop coming into work for a month at a large organization, chances are high the business will continue as usual. The extreme example is an Indian government employee who called in sick for 24 years!

At a small company, you must know your stuff and produce. Small companies generally have tighter budgets, less people by some definition, and a time limit to expiration given many startups are loss-making. If a company burns $10 million a year and only has $12 million left in the bank, the pressure is on!

There’s no room for holding meetings about meetings on what to do. There’s no room for people telling others what to do without doing anything themselves. Everybody must pitch in to produce something valuable.

Now think about the dichotomy between small companies and large companies from an investor’s point of view. Do you want to invest your money in ex-growth companies where people have a tendency to come in late, leave early, and do the bare minimum? I don’t. The hustle, drive, and innovation is why I’m a big fan of investing in growth companies and private startups. The problem now is that the private equity market is richly valued.

From Welfare to Well-Off: My Journey To Financial Independence

The journey to financial independenceThe following is a guest post by Samurai Dominic. He shares his story about escaping the life of trouble and poverty towards one day reaching financial independence. Reading different perspectives is what makes the Financial Samurai community so awesome. – Sam

They say the best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago. You know when the second best time is? TODAY!

As you are about to discover, it doesn’t matter where you start in life, what matters is how you play the hand you were dealt. You can stand around and complain how the world is unfair, and yes it is very unfair…get over it. Complaining and dwelling on your dire circumstances will do nothing to improve your life, so don’t waste your time. The thing to remember is that successful people do what unsuccessful people are unwilling to do.

We live in unprecedented times with more opportunity than any other time in history. You just have to decide if you are willing to put in the work to achieve your vision of success.

You could say I am one of those rags to riches stories in the making. I entered this world like most, in a hospital room naked and screaming. However, I entered the world with absolutely no advantage. Some might say I was dealt a crap hand. I grew up in a low income area, where my family and most other families were on welfare or some kind of government support. Growing up I slept on the hard-floor of my grandmother’s 2-bedroom apartment with my 3 brothers, while my grandmother and mom shared a bed, and my uncle had the other room.

Shit, we were so poor that my grandmother would use the oven to heat the apartment (not cooking for, but cracking the oven door while it was on with nothing in it). That could not have been safe. And to this day I don’t really know if it was actually cheaper to heat the apartment using the oven vs. the actual heating unit. Either way my grandmother was determined it was the best and cheapest way to heat the house.

How Long Will The Average Person Take To Earn $1 Million Around The World?

The Economist put out an interesting chart highlighting how long it takes the median household income to earn $1 million dollars before tax. Have a look.

How long does it take to earn one million dollars around the world

Given the median US household income is roughly $52,000, it will take roughly 19.3 years for the typical household to earn $1 million gross. That’s pretty good if you think about it. Let’s say you graduate college at age 22. By the time you are 41, you could have earned over a million bucks gross!

But as we know in personal finance, it’s not what you make, it’s what you keep. If the typical household saves 10% of their gross earnings, then one can expect a $100,000 – $200,000 net worth by the time the head of household is 41 years old. Not bad, but certainly no million bucks!

Is Company Loyalty Costing You A Fortune? Here’s How I Lost $500,000 In Three Years

loyalty

Loyal dog. Woof

One of my regrets between 2007-2012 was not aggressively entertaining other job offers. By 2007, I had been with my previous company for six years and felt tremendous loyalty to the firm. How could I hop to a competitor for more money when my company first gave me a chance here in San Francisco? I now wonder whether the reason why I stayed at my firm for 11 consecutive years is because of my predisposition to feel guilty whenever something good happens.

Instead of leaving for another firm, I simply asked my boss in a nice way what I should do if they were me when I was getting aggressively courted. They always told me to stay and simply offered me a raise between what I was getting paid and what I was being offered by a competing firm. I never pushed them to match because I didn’t want to create a hostage scenario of resentment. Wall Street income is relatively absurd compared to practically every other industry, so I found it always distasteful when people complained about their bonuses.

But if I managed my career perfectly, I could have made $400,000 more after tax if I had accepted a juicy, two-year guaranteed income offer at another firm in NYC from 2010-2011. I left Wall Street in 2012 anyway, so it didn’t matter that I was going from a bulge bracket firm to a lower tier firm because I was never going back to finance.

Even after a four-hour interview with the interested company’s CEO in NYC, who so happened to be the eldest son of China’s former Premier, I still couldn’t take the leap out of loyalty to my firm. If you were a fly on the wall during our interview, you would have thought that I was some type of superstar based on the praise he gave. I stood stubbornly strong like a patriotic soldier and politely declined multiple times after.

NYC is a great place to visit, but pretty much sucks in terms of cost and work/life balance. Besides entering a much more stressful lifestyle for two years if I took the job, I was also hesitant to sell my house in 2010 given the real estate market was still depressed. Another concern was whether or not the courting firm would actually pay the second year guarantee if the first year performance results were not up to expectations. I heard stories of companies luring employees in with great promises only to welch during the second year. What was the new employee supposed to do after getting screwed in the second year but suck it up, sue his employer, or find another job. It’s not as easy finding another job if you’re coming from a small shop.

Although I missed out on some heavy dollars, at least I was able to negotiate a severance package from my firm of 11 years that lightened the blow. It would have been impossible to negotiate a severance if I quit after a two-year guarantee at the new firm. Manhattan is a wonderful playground if you have money. Alas, I’ll never know.