Mortgage As A Forced Savings Account To Build Wealth

Ship in a storm - Money leaking everywhere

Our journey with money

Back in 2000, many investors were cocky, much like investors today with the stock market at record highs. I remember asking my Director at the time what he thought about the concept of the mortgage as a forced savings account? At the time, as an investor, it appeared he could do no wrong.

He said, “I don’t need no forced savings account. Only irresponsible people who don’t have the discipline to save every month would consider their mortgage as savings. I’d rather have as big of a mortgage as possible so I can make money in the stock market!

My Director ended up losing millions when the dotcom bubble collapsed. He no longer looked down on people who slowly grew their wealth. At least, unlike most people, he had millions to lose!

If you have a traditional mortgage that pays down principal and interest, the mortgage “forces” you to save because you are forced to pay your mortgage every month if you want to keep your property. A percentage of each mortgage payment goes towards principal, which can be considered savings.

I’m also in the camp that it’s better for most people to receive a tax refund, even though it’s like giving the government an interest free loan, because most people can’t save for crap!

The Average Net Worth By Age For The Upper Middle Class

Upper Middle Class LifestyleThe upper middle class, aka the mass affluent, are loosely defined as individuals with a net worth or investable assets between $100,000 to $2 million. Some also define upper middle class as those who are college educated with incomes in the top 15% – roughly $100,000 or greater for households or $63,000 or greater for individuals.

The upper middle class is different from the rich because there’s a good chance everybody can achieve mass affluent status if they work and save for a long enough period of time. The mass affluent didn’t inherit their money, they earned it through hard work. On the other hand, getting rich often takes a tremendous amount of luck.

The Cost Of Traveling To Asia: Time For Another Business Trip!

Angkor Wat, Cambodia by Linda Russell

Angkor Wat, Cambodia

Much of Financial Samurai’s culture is about bringing various worldwide perspectives to financial topics we care about. If we can assemble the best aspects of each culture onto one site, we could create a valuable resource of wealth and happiness for millions.

From 2011 – 2014, I traveled to Europe for several weeks at a time to understand the happiest people on Earth. We looked into more sensitive topics such as combatting apathy and whether it was so bad that America was turning into Europe with higher taxes, increased welfare, and an overall larger government presence.

I could go back to Hawaii or Lake Tahoe for a vacation, but I’ve decided it’s time to return to a region where I spent the first 13 years of my life. It’s been four years since I’ve been back and I’m curious to see how things have changed.

On this business trip, I’d like to research the following questions:

* Why are the Chinese so dominant in business in Malaysia? Malaysia is mostly made up of Malays, Chinese, and Indians with several rules favoring Malays. I wonder if those rules still exist. Are countries around the equator less productive? Or is this some type of misconception? I grew up in KL from 1988-1991 and want to better understand the country now as an adult. 

* What is the latest sentiment about China from the Taiwanese? When I lived in Taipei from 1984-1988, there was a lot of fear that China would invade Taiwan and take the country over. Now that China and Taiwan have prospered so greatly over the past 25 years, do they dare disrupt their fortunes over politics?

* How do South Koreans feel about the situation in North Korea? What is the existing attitude of South Koreans towards Japan and the United States? Are the family empires (chaebols) gaining or losing their significance? How is the manufacturing industry competing so well against Japan’s manufacturing industry? I’ve only been to Seoul once, but Seoul seemed like a dirtier, more chaotic version of Tokyo. Korean culture is the one culture I’ve never been able to fully connect with. 

How Much Does IVF And Eastern Medicine Cost To Combat Infertility?

These IUI meds are a cake walk in comparison to IVF

These IUI meds are a cake walk in comparison to IVF

Today’s post comes from a reader named Melissa who is facing the expensive decision of trying IVF with her husband in order to have their first child. Infertility is a sensitive and grappling topic that many couples are facing today. We’re having children later now due to our careers, and many of us are struggling to conceive.

Unfortunately, a lot of infertility issues are still unexplained and couples are left facing a foggy future of many unknowns. Even though IVF has enabled many couples to have children, it has also disappointed many others. How much would you be willing to pay to start a family if IVF was your best chance at having a child? Let’s take a look at the costs of IVF and the emotional and financial challenges couples like Melissa and her husband face when trying to start a family.

According to the Center For Disease Control, 6% of women (1.5 million) in the US are infertile. Other sources such as the National Institutes of Health say the percentage of infertile couples is as high as 15%! The numbers are significant and unfortunately I’m one of them.

Even though you don’t know me personally, chances are pretty high that you and your spouse or someone you know has also dealt with the struggles of infertility. The average couple trying takes around seven months to conceive. Meanwhile, I know plenty of couples who’ve taken years.

Speaking from experience, infertility is not an easy subject to talk about, especially the longer you try to get pregnant without success. But a lot of times people don’t realize how emotional infertility can be, especially if you never had any issues yourself or had a “surprise” or two. And to top off the roller coaster of emotions people like me have to deal with, it’s crazy expensive!

How To Make Six Figures A Year And Still Not Feel Rich – $200,000 Income Edition

Luxury home on the water

Earning Six Figures Is Not Enough To Buy This Home

One of the great things about America is freedom. Tired of feeling like death living in Chicago or Boston during the winter? Why hello San Diego, Miami, and Honolulu! Not feeling there are enough job opportunities for advancement in Detroit? Then come on down to New York City! Tired of eating healthy food in San Francisco that costs an arm and a leg? No city can beat the wonderful soul food of New Orleans.

Geo-arbitrage is a term where one can earn and save money in one place and move to a cheaper location to maximize their money. I highly recommend it. If you happen to own an internet business, then your ability to geo-arbitrage is greatest. I’ve often thought about just relocating to Thailand for several months at a time given friends say they live extremely well off $2,000 a month for two. Given one of my goals is to take 100 hours of intensive Mandarin lessons, I may very well be writing to you from some lower cost country in the future.

75% of the audience comes to Financial Samurai through a search engine like Google. They have a financial problem they are trying to solve. This is huge because it takes initiative to come to grips with one’s finances. But what I’ve noticed over time is that besides the middle class getting pissed off about the widening wealth gap, upper-income earners are also feeling some angst as well.

Over 50% of singles readers and 74% of household readers make over $100,000 a year based on my Financial Samurai income poll. As a result, I’d like to delve into analyzing how a “typical” $200,000 a year household spends their income. A six figure salary can range from $100,000 to $999,999, so I figure I’d start on the low end for two people. $200,000 is a comfortable household income, but I don’t think it can qualify as rich.

Who Should Pay For The Wedding? A Logical Guide To Lavish Spending

Winter Valentine's by Colleen Kong-Savage

A Wintery Valentine’s by Kongaline.com

Do you know what’s crazy? Spending $25,000 – $30,000 on the average cost of a wedding in America if you make a median household income of $52,000. What’s worse is going into debt to get married, especially since there’s a 50% chance it won’t last!

In many Asian countries, the parents of the bride foot the entire wedding bill because of the now backwards idea that the husband is “relieving” the parents of the financial costs of caring for their daughter. I can hear many Westerns scoffing at this way of thinking, but before the 1970s it was rare to have dual income households in America. One of my neighbors is a 30-something year old woman who still lives with her 55+ year old Chinese mother. Living with your parents until marriage is quite commonplace for many Asian and Hispanic cultures.

The one thing many Asian weddings have that Western weddings don’t have is the ability to make money during your wedding. I went to my friend’s wedding in Taipei and he actually made about $100,000 from his 50 table, 400 person wedding. The Chinese have a culture of giving monetary gifts in the form of red envelopes during weddings and Lunar New Year. If you are a business associate invited to the wedding, you better give at least $500-$1,000 or else you might not have much business left for the year!

In many Western countries, the parents of the groom pay for all wedding expenses. The thought process is that the groom’s parents are honored to have such a wonderful woman be their son’s life partner to love and care for him through sickness, health, wealth, and poverty. I like this thought process a lot, but as a son of middle class parents who went to a cheap public school, I would feel bad for my parents to pay. But as noted with the many commenters in this post, in America, there’s also a strong tradition of the parents of the bride to pay.

Finally, there’s a growing trend for many lovebirds to pay for the large majority of their wedding cost themselves. Out of the past five weddings I’ve attended, all five were predominantly paid for by the bride and groom. I’ve asked other 25-40 year olds and they’ve said the same thing. Perhaps parents might pay for the venue, or the flowers, but certainly not everything.

One of the main reasons why more wedding costs are born on the bride and groom is because they want their wedding to be a certain way. We’re much more picky and elaborate nowadays it seems. And if your parents are paying for everything, they may put a lot of pressure on you to do things their way instead of yours. This may affect the guest list, the location, the vendors, and more.

Do You Have A Hoarding Problem? Five Points To Identify That You Do

Hoarder

Are you a crazy hoarder?

A funny thing is going on in San Francisco right now. After Uber hired Goldman to raise $1 billion in a convertible debt sale, Uber launched a $5 UberPool campaign for a limited time on rides anywhere in San Francisco. UberPool is Uber’s carpooling service where they charge an even lower rate than their UberX offering. $5 to go anywhere in SF is truly a game-changing move that makes me not want to ever drive again in The City. The traffic has turned horrendous with unemployment below 4%.

It takes me about 30 minutes on average to drive downtown from Golden Gate Heights in rush hour traffic plus parking. There’s of course the cost of gas, potential tickets, and the risk of accidents I’ve got to deal with as well. I’d totally pay $10 roundtrip for the 3X a week I go downtown and leave Rhino, my sexy beast, at home.

But guess what? I haven’t called a single UberPool because I’ve currently got 10 free rides, each worth $20 – $30, sitting in my account! I’m not going to burn one ride that now only costs $5 with one of my $20-$30 credits, no sir! I’m going to hoard my free rides for when I go to the airport – a $30-$35 fee from my house. You see, if a ride only costs $15 and I use one of my $30 credits, I lose the other $15. And even if the app is smart enough to let me use the $5 promo on UberPool, instead of automatically applying one of my $20-$30 credits, I’m still not willing to risk it.

Like any good frugal person would do, I told my friends to book an UberPool instead, and take me along for a ride. Genius!

How did I get all my free ride credits? That’s easy. Each person who tries out Uber using my referral code gets a $20 free ride and so do I. All you gotta do to replicate my Uber credit galore is spend 25 hours a week writing for five years in a row and you’re good to go!

Too bad the promotional value is only $20 a ride now, down from $30 in 2014. But they’ve now smartly shifted the promotion strategy to subsidizing drivers with their $5 UberPool to get consumers to try their carpooling service. If you haven’t tried Uber, it absolutely makes transportation cheaper and easier.