Sponsored Video: The State Of The Global Economy

Whenever I travel on a long business trip overseas, I always ask the flight attendant for three papers: The FT, The Wall Street Journal, and a copy of the destination city’s newspaper. This way, I can get a blend of global + local news in order to converse more easily with the clients I’m visiting.

If you ever wonder how some people can make cocktail party conversations look so easy, it’s simply because they are voracious consumers of media. If you can seamlessly switch from sharing your views on the new French Socialist President Hollande’s policies to April’s US existing housing sales rebound to whether OKC will take out San Antonio in 6 or 7 games, you will be a master of conversation.

Financial Samurai’s editorial will continue to contain a combination of topical posts along with personal stories to keep things interesting.  In fact, I dare say that if you become a regular reader of this site, your cocktail party conversational skills will shoot through the roof!

In the below 3 minute 29 second video, you’ll gain a quick snapshot of the global economy and where specific countries stand in terms of size, GDP per capita, growth, education, and happiness.  Remember, everything is relative and making tons of money isn’t necessarily better if it takes many more hours in the process.  Have a look at the video and let me know your thoughts on what stood out.

Some points that stood out:

* New Zealand has 1 ranked education system vs. #5 for the US

* Netherlands is #1 in pay per hour.

* Brazil legally gets 30 days off vs. 5 in China and 0 in US.

* Brazil is considered the happiest country in the world.  Although, based on a latest OECD happiness report, Denmark, Norway, and the Netherlands are even happier.

This video was sponsored by The Financial Times.

Sam started Financial Samurai in 2009 during the depths of the financial crisis as a way to make sense of chaos. After 13 years working on Wall Street, Sam decided to retire in 2012 to utilize everything he learned in business school to focus on online entrepreneurship.

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Comments

  1. says

    FT is a great newspaper. I can only get it here on a 1-day delay, though. Unfortunate.

    Good to see the America can still drink everyone else under the table. High-five to that, right?

  2. says

    The statistics were interesting, but I believe in the individual. Anybody can succeed if they want to. Maybe that is the real meaning of the USA.

  3. says

    Hey that’s a cool video. I like watching visual stats like that and looking at things from a different angle. That’s really crazy about the differences in vacation time, earnings per hour, and what you can buy with a days pay.

    And maybe I should start looking into moving to Brazil!

  4. says

    Man, I can’t believe you guys have no mandated paid holiday time! (But now I’m envious of Brazil’s 30 days – 20 doesn’t seem so much in comparison. I think we also have 11 public holidays.)

    Surprised to hear about our education system. Maybe it’s not uber prestigious but I do think you get good value out of it.

  5. Mike Hunt says

    Aah, lies, damned lies and statistics. Maybe it’s the dates used and countries screened. I thought a European country would take the #1 per capita beer drinking, you can see in this article the #1 from 2009 was Portugal…

    http://www.cnbc.com/id/26789471/Top_20_Beer_Drinking_Countries?slide=2

    The fascinating thing I picked up in this video is that the purchasing power parity of Russia looks terrible compared to many countries. Wonder where they rank on the Big Mac index.

    -Mike

  6. says

    China has 5 days and the US has zero? I’m totally willing to trade our standard hourly rate for the wonderful $.57/hour they have over there if it means 5 mandated holidays :)

    Interesting on the happiness stats though. Perhaps having more opportunity means greater disappointment? Perhaps chasing after more money isn’t a fulfilling goal? It would definitely be interesting to know why.

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